Macroeconomics and the Global Economy

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Macroeconomics and the Global Economy
Economics Course
Course CodeMACR
Year Opened2010
Sites OfferedCAR, HKU, JHU, LOS, SAR
Previously OfferedLAN
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Course Description

It has the same prerequisite as Fundamentals of Microeconomics

Students in this course explore fundamental concepts in macroeconomics including national income, economic growth, inflation, employment, money, banking, financial markets, and the role of public policy. Building upon this foundation, students consider the global economy and issues in international trade and finance. Students examine comparative advantage and balance of payments, along with exchange rates and foreign currencies. By applying mathematical concepts to economic theory, students explore how economists analyze and predict changes in the economy.

Through lectures, readings, discussions, simulations, and research, students gain a firm grounding in macroeconomics and an introduction to central concepts in international trade and finance. Throughout the course, they draw from this knowledge to better understand the state of the US and world economies today.


Class History

At JHU 16.1, MACR-A was taught by Señor Jorge Sanchez, and TA'd by Zeeshan (Mr. TA). Remember, Chair Yellen locks her 17 husbands behind a glass screen. This class was able to convince Mr. Sanchez and Mr. Zeeshan to let them run around campus on several occasions. ¡Les amamos!

At SAR 16.1, Macro was a legendary class. it consisted of many nevermores, including Polina Whitehouse, Adam Garrity, Duncan Freeman, Quin Koether, Bingbing Zhang, Rachel Xiang, Libby Owen, Isabel Wallgren, Natasha Stange, and Hailey Horowitz. Its teacher, the magnificent Jun Lou, did not speak English or know anything about Macroeconomics. On the first day of class he informed everyone that all white people looked the same and proceeded to go around the room and force each student to share his or her class ranking. One time he drew a graph on the board intending for it to measure the consumption of Ice Cream vs. Frozen Yogurt but instead of writing yogurt he wrote "yoga" and continued to confuse the two words. Nobody really ever understood him. The TA, Yolanda, was super chill and wore a hat that read "Good Vibes Only," a "gift" from her friend. Yolanda sat in the back of the classroom and giggled quietly to herself about the dysfunctional class. Most students spent time either sleeping or playing evil apples beneath the table, and many times these students were caught because they forgot to turn their volume off. The students spent most nights in the Academic Counselor's office talking about all of the problems with macro. Towards the end of the session, an administrative figure, most likely on drugs, came to sit in on the class in an attempt to control the chaos. In summary, this class was insanely lit and will go down in CTY history.